JAGAT SHIROMANI TEMPLE

Jagat Shiromani Temple is situated in Amber Jaipur, Rajasthan, India. This magnificent temple dedicated to Meera Bai and Lord Krishna. I visited this temple on the “World Tourism Day” conducted by “Department of Tourism, Government of Rajasthan”. I want to thank Rajasthan Government for conductiong such type of heritage walk where we came to know about the hidden gems of our city.

jagat shiromani temple plinth
Stairs leading to the Temple

This temple has important place in the history of Amber town. This temple was built between 1599-1608 AD by the queen Kanakwati wife of king Man Singh 1st in the memory of son Jagat Singh.

Meera bai is the devote of lord Krishna. She was the wife of Mewar king though in childhood she devote to the Lord Krishna and considered him as her husband. That’s why this temple is also called Meera bai temple.

amber toran
Carved Torana

This temple is near to the Amber palace (fort). The temple has two entrances gate. The main entrance gate can be accessed from the main road of Amer town. The other gate is from the stair of the amer palace which leads to the inside of the temple open courtyard.

Architecture

It is one of the oldest temple of Amber town. The best specimen of early 17th century Mahameru Prasad. The entrance of the temple there is beautiful marble torana (pylon) which is flanked by statue of elephants. The toran is the marvelous piece of architecture. In this toran various Gods idol image is intricately carved which looks very beautiful. This temple was built in Besar Style.

In a canopy joined with this temple, is the idol of Garuda, which is a carrier of Lord Vishnu. This is placed at the entrance in a canopy.

IMG_3720
Canopy joined with the Temple
garuda idol of vishnu
Idol of Garuda
hindu arch
Hindu Arch
IMG_3748
Carvings on the Exterior

The temple has lot of carving on the exterior, predominantly in the pedestal section and in canopy housing Garuda. Below is a picture, which shows army of elephants in one row, horse in another at the top and face of tiger below it. There are two elephants in playful mood at the base. On the top second row is a illustration of some sort of procession and people are depicted in a jubilant mood. The top row has  a carvings of a birds quite possibly, peacock.Placed just above the pedestal in black stone are three marbles plates, depiction of Indian mythological characters – possibly Gods and Goddesses.

The interior of the Shri Jagat Siromani Temple is built mostly using red sandstone. It consists of a mandapa hall, leading into an antrala, which precedes the garbha griha (inner sanctuary). The mandapa hall is square-shaped with a lofty ceiling and is flanked by double arched porticoes on either side, supported by intricately carved columns and lintels. The antrala is separated from the mandapa by a carved railing in white marble and red sandstone. Beyond the antrala is the garbha griha, which contains images of the several gods honoured at this temple, and is topped by the high sikhara tower. Intricately carved white marble frames the doorway which leads into the garbha griha. This area is off-limits. The walls of upper storey and ceiling bear painting the marble garuda-mandapa in front of the temple is intricately carved which is carrier of lord Vishnu.

Legend

IMG_3729
Statue of Lord Krishna

There is an interesting story about this temple. It is said that the statue of Lord Krishna in this temple is same statue that Meera Bai used to worship in the state of mewar, 600 years ago. This statue was saved from destruction by rulers of Amer during Mughal war with Mewar state and brought safely to Amer. And statue was set in a temple. Even statue of Meera Bai has been set along with Lord Krishna.

Jagat shiromani temple is very important part of heritage, architecture and religious point of view. And you can feel peace here.

How to reach:

Temple is located in Amer town and can be reached easily through the left lane just after the Amer Elephant stand on Amer Road.

DSCN9841
View of Jagat Shiromani Temple from road

photo courtesy: Ronak Dhupia/ Satish Kumawat

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s